SEMINARS


Webinar by Rossella Salandra, University of Bath, "Does rivalry influence selective reporting? A competitive dynamics perspective on comparative trials for antidepressant drugs".

SPEAKER

Rossella Salandra, 

University of Bath










DATE

Jan. the 19th 2021

11:00 to 12:00 London time.


LOCATION

Event will be held online

TECHNIS is pleased to invite you to a free webinar. TECHNIS webinars focus on IP and innovation examining recent legal, economic, managerial, ethical and policy issues related to technological innovation. Our approach is interdisciplinary and presentations are given by experts in different fields such as economics, law, management, STS, sociology, anthropology and philosophy. Webinar presentations last for 20min and are followed by a 40min discussion.


Please join us for a webinar on Tuesday the 19th of January 2021 at 11:00 London time i.e. 12:00 Brussels time, 13:00 Athens time. The speaker is Rossella Salandra, University of Bath, School of Management, Strategy & Organisation Division. The title of the talk is "Does rivalry influence selective reporting? A competitive dynamics perspective on comparative trials for antidepressant drugs".


The moderator is Dr. Andreas PanagopoulosTo join us follow this link:

https://hello.freeconference.com/conf/call/3011249


This webinar is free and open to all. To participate and for further information, please contact Dr. Andreas Panagopoulos at least a day prior to the seminar.


Abstract: Competition creates inducements for the firms to use scientific publications as a purposeful tool to encourage adoption of their innovations. While the competitive dynamics literature has emphasized the role of the content of scientific information in competitive actions, little is known about the link between competitive conditions, and particularly the relational factors shaping it, and the use of deliberate tactics to shape information content in product markets. Using data on comparative clinical trials for antidepressants conducted between 1983 and 2012, we find that rivalry relationships between the two drugs investigated in a comparative study influence the likelihood of selective reporting of scientific information. Focusing on the selective reporting of drug’s side effects and controlling for objective characteristics of the competitive situation, we reveal that selective reporting is shaped by three sources of rivalry i.e., similarity, repeated interaction, and competitiveness. We discuss implications of our findings for the competitive dynamics and innovation literature.





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